June 16, 2011
Metro beekeeper Gregg McMahan leads a class Saturday on backyard hives. “It’s magical for people,” he says of the cottage industry. The surge in urban beekeeping has been driven by women, experts say. McMahan would agree, as a majority of his students are women. (Photo by Karl Gehring, The Denver Post)
From the story:

In 2006, honeybee colonies began to mysteriously vanish from the American landscape. Scientists gave the phenomenon a name — colony collapse disorder — and the U.S. Department of Agriculture set aside $20 million a year for five years to study it.
There are still no answers to what is killing the bees.

Metro beekeeper Gregg McMahan leads a class Saturday on backyard hives. “It’s magical for people,” he says of the cottage industry. The surge in urban beekeeping has been driven by women, experts say. McMahan would agree, as a majority of his students are women. (Photo by Karl Gehring, The Denver Post)

From the story:

In 2006, honeybee colonies began to mysteriously vanish from the American landscape. Scientists gave the phenomenon a name — colony collapse disorder — and the U.S. Department of Agriculture set aside $20 million a year for five years to study it.

There are still no answers to what is killing the bees.

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