March 21, 2013
Born with a neck up
A gerenuk has been born at the Denver Zoo for the first time .
Blossom was born March 6 to parents Woody and Layla, the zoo said in a news release Thursday.
A gerenuk is a small antelope from semi-arid areas of eastern Africa.

Born with a neck up

A gerenuk has been born at the Denver Zoo for the first time .

Blossom was born March 6 to parents Woody and Layla, the zoo said in a news release Thursday.

A gerenuk is a small antelope from semi-arid areas of eastern Africa.

October 19, 2012

Baby tapir saved at birth by mouth-to-snout resuscitation

Staff at the Denver Zoo saved the life of a Malayan tapir calf when they took extraordinary efforts during a recent birthing.
Rinny, the zoo’s female tapir, was having trouble while giving birth to a calf last month and a staffer freed the newborn from the mother’s amniotic sac. After successfully helping to extract the calf, zoo members aided the newborn by performing “mouth to snout rescue breaths,” the zoo said in a media release Friday.
The zoo released a 90-second video of the dramatic rescue, included in the link above.

August 31, 2012
Health of Mimi the elephant, aging Denver Zoo icon, in steep decline
Mimi is an old girl — the grand dame of the Denver Zoo, where she has ruled the roost since 1961 in spite of her shyness.
She is at least 53, and elephants, under human care and in the wild, have an average life span of just over 44 years.
Mimi’s slow decline has been steeper lately and harder to watch. Tender feet, sore joints and a slower gait have been apparent for a while — but when their “big-boned” girl recently lost her legendary appetite, zookeepers started thinking about the end.
"Mimi is one of the most beloved animals in the zoo,"  said Craig Piper, Denver Zoo president and chief executive. "We want everyone in Denver to understand how precious she is."
But it may be time for the community to prepare to say goodbye.

Health of Mimi the elephant, aging Denver Zoo icon, in steep decline

Mimi is an old girl — the grand dame of the Denver Zoo, where she has ruled the roost since 1961 in spite of her shyness.

She is at least 53, and elephants, under human care and in the wild, have an average life span of just over 44 years.

Mimi’s slow decline has been steeper lately and harder to watch. Tender feet, sore joints and a slower gait have been apparent for a while — but when their “big-boned” girl recently lost her legendary appetite, zookeepers started thinking about the end.

"Mimi is one of the most beloved animals in the zoo,"  said Craig Piper, Denver Zoo president and chief executive. "We want everyone in Denver to understand how precious she is."

But it may be time for the community to prepare to say goodbye.

June 19, 2012
A leopard cub, a member of a critically endangered species, born at the Denver Zoo this spring can now be seen by the public.
Until now, Makar, an Amur leopard, has been kept behind the scenes with his mother, Dazma, but veterinarians just gave the go ahead for the cub to be viewed at the zoo’s Feline Building. 
Amur leopards are nearly extinct in the wild, with a small number — less than 40 — remaining in eastern Russia. 

A leopard cub, a member of a critically endangered species, born at the Denver Zoo this spring can now be seen by the public.

Until now, Makar, an Amur leopard, has been kept behind the scenes with his mother, Dazma, but veterinarians just gave the go ahead for the cub to be viewed at the zoo’s Feline Building. 

Amur leopards are nearly extinct in the wild, with a small number — less than 40 — remaining in eastern Russia. 

(Source: denverpost.com`)

April 6, 2012

If you think all cats are afraid of water, meet Maliha.

The Denver Zoo is adding a species of cat to its roster, a 5-year-old “fishing cat” named Maliha, according to a zoo media release.

Prionailurus viverrinus — fishing cat — is a cat species scattered throughout southwest India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Malaysia, Thailand, Sumatra, Java and Pakistan. They live primarily in wetland areas like swamps, marshes and densely vegetated areas along rivers and streams.

August 17, 2011
Capybaras trending on Google
Capybaras are trending on Google right now, most likely because of this LA Times article detailing a capybara sighting at a wastewater treatment plant. 
Capybaras, the largest rodents in the world, thrive in central and South America.
The Denver Post had its own capybaras story last week, as the Denver Zoo welcomed brother and sister capybaras named Rodrigo and Gabriella  now living in the Tropical Discovery exhibit.
 
 

Capybaras trending on Google

Capybaras are trending on Google right now, most likely because of this LA Times article detailing a capybara sighting at a wastewater treatment plant. 

Capybaras, the largest rodents in the world, thrive in central and South America.

The Denver Post had its own capybaras story last week, as the Denver Zoo welcomed brother and sister capybaras named Rodrigo and Gabriella now living in the Tropical Discovery exhibit.

 

 

August 12, 2011
Animal Photo of the Day
 
Two of the largest rodents in the world are roaming part of the Denver Zoo as “welcome guests.”
Rodrigo and Gabriella, brother and sister capybaras, are now living  in the Tropical Discovery exhibit, zoo officials said in a news release  Thursday.
The two were born Feb. 17 and came to Denver from the Buffalo Zoo in New York.
Capybaras, the largest rodents in the world, thrive in central and  South America. They spend some time on land, but their webbed toes and  the orientation of their eyes, nostrils and ears — located near top of  their heads — make them agile swimmers. Thus their name, which is Greek  for “water pig.”
(read more)

Animal Photo of the Day

Two of the largest rodents in the world are roaming part of the Denver Zoo as “welcome guests.”

Rodrigo and Gabriella, brother and sister capybaras, are now living in the Tropical Discovery exhibit, zoo officials said in a news release Thursday.

The two were born Feb. 17 and came to Denver from the Buffalo Zoo in New York.

Capybaras, the largest rodents in the world, thrive in central and South America. They spend some time on land, but their webbed toes and the orientation of their eyes, nostrils and ears — located near top of their heads — make them agile swimmers. Thus their name, which is Greek for “water pig.”

(read more)

July 15, 2011
Big, flightless bird escapes pen at Denver Zoo
A cassowary, a large, flightless bird native to Australia, escaped its enclosure this afternoon at the Denver Zoo.  
The front entrance to the zoo has been closed as a safety protocol.
"They’re large in size," Barnhart said of the bird. "We are definitely taking every precaution."
UPDATE: The cassowary has been caught and is in custody.

Big, flightless bird escapes pen at Denver Zoo

A cassowary, a large, flightless bird native to Australia, escaped its enclosure this afternoon at the Denver Zoo. 

The front entrance to the zoo has been closed as a safety protocol.

"They’re large in size," Barnhart said of the bird. "We are definitely taking every precaution."

UPDATE: The cassowary has been caught and is in custody.

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