December 1, 2012

Oh baby! Baby animals from around the world

A collection photos of baby animals from around the world: some in captivity, some in the wild; some common, some exotic; some incredibly cute, others incredibly ugly.

(Source: The Denver Post)

July 28, 2011
Animal Photo of the Day
A veterinarian  stretches her hands to protect a little owl, which is poisoned by  pesticide and suffering from a neurological disorder that makes it  difficult to keep its balance while standing, after a medical check at  the Beijing Raptor Rescue Center in Beijing, China. As Beijing falls  along a north-south migratory route that the birds use, more than 43  types of raptors can be found in the city year-round, some of which die  or are injured in collisions with skyscrapers and overhead lines or   trapped by illegal bird catchers. 
(AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

Animal Photo of the Day

A veterinarian stretches her hands to protect a little owl, which is poisoned by pesticide and suffering from a neurological disorder that makes it difficult to keep its balance while standing, after a medical check at the Beijing Raptor Rescue Center in Beijing, China. As Beijing falls along a north-south migratory route that the birds use, more than 43 types of raptors can be found in the city year-round, some of which die or are injured in collisions with skyscrapers and overhead lines or trapped by illegal bird catchers.

(AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

(Source: The Denver Post)

May 11, 2011
Two baby great horned owls were rescued  today by volunteers near Grand Junction, Colo., after their nest fell about 60 feet. Jordan Steffen reports:

A volunteer Wildlife Rescue Team for the  Colorado Division of Wildlife received a call from two women at the  Audubon-Ela Sanctuary who had been watching the owls’ nest, concerned  that the nest was too heavy for tree it was in, said volunteer Steve  Bouricius.

Photo above courtesy of Eileen Cunningham, click for more. 

Two baby great horned owls were rescued today by volunteers near Grand Junction, Colo., after their nest fell about 60 feet. Jordan Steffen reports:

A volunteer Wildlife Rescue Team for the Colorado Division of Wildlife received a call from two women at the Audubon-Ela Sanctuary who had been watching the owls’ nest, concerned that the nest was too heavy for tree it was in, said volunteer Steve Bouricius.

Photo above courtesy of Eileen Cunningham, click for more. 

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